Review in IRR on Recordermusic by Axel Borup-Jørgenssen
IRR Magazine
19 October 2014
The harpsichord also features on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen alongside percussion and the twin recorders of Elisabet Selin and Michala Petri, a similary new life afforded an ancient instrument previously exemplified in this column by Petri´s work with Palle Mikkelborgs and the Burgess disc covered in the October issue. The works are various combinations of these instruments, their structural rigour and striking timbral contrasts giving the programme a genuinely other-worldly quality, as if of a fascinating tradition imported wholesale from some parallel universe. However, I feel justified in delivering a reprimand for a fault I Thought was long extinct, which is failing to get native speakers to vet your booklet note translations, being told, for example, that one of the composer's early artistic skills was as " an impressive drawer" cue "part of the furniture" jokes) devalues the whole process of supporting music with text. Roger Thomas, International Record Review (IRR) January 2014.
IRR Magazine

Enthusiastic US review on "Recordermusic by Axel Borup-Jørgensen"
Grego Applegate Edwards
04 September 2014
Up until now when I thought of recorders, I thought of the baroque and early music periods and the sound one hears in such contexts. It never occurred to me that the high modern arena would utilize the family of instruments and I cannot recall having heard such a thing.
But all that is in the past now that I have immersed myself in Axel Borup-Jorgensen's CD Recorder Music (OUR Recordings 8.226910). We are treated to eight compositions for various-sized recorders--alone, with harpsichord or with percussion. No less than seven of these works are enjoying their world premier recordings on this disk.

The recorder performances are in the hands of Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin, and they are impressive exponents indeed. Ingrid Myrhoj appears on harpsichord for two pieces; Gert Mortensen plays the multiple percussion instrument part on the one work involved. Everyone sounds great but it is the expanded recorder techniques and the clarity, dynamic thrust and elan of their execution that bring it all together.

Alex Borup-Jorgensen (1924-2012) wrote these works between 1975 and 2011. That they were a labor of love seems clear as you listen. The mastering of the recorder parts by Michala Petri and Elizabet Selin were no doubt labors of love as well.

The earlier works feature rapid-fire jumps into and out of various registers; the later works less so. In any case the parts are difficult and superbly played. It's almost uncanny to hear the recorder in an expanded, ultra-modern tonality. Once one gets over the shock the idea that these are fine works that bear repeated hearings sets in. And from that point I was hooked.

This is not just state-of-the-art modern recorder music. It is also a collection of very pleasing high-modern chamber music.

Very much recommended.



Posted by  Grego Applegate Edwards February 3th 2014
Grego Applegate Edwards

Great Gramophone review on Recorder Music by Axel-Borup-Jørgensen
Gramophone Magazine
24 March 2014
Gramophone on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Gramophone Collector, New Music from Denmark. Richard Whitehouse takes the pulse of Denmark's contemporary music scene through four discs of new writing.
Although Finland has latterly made the running in terms of new music, the Danish scene has long been one of strength in diversity – confirmed by the four discs under consideration.
Only recently has the music of Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012) enjoyed wider attention. A disc of percussion works (9/14) detonate a figure of sensitivity and refinement, reinforced by this anthology of pieces for and featuring recorder on the enterprising OUR Recordings label co-founded by Michala Petri.
This is also an overview of Borup-Jørgensen's evolution over his final three decades of composing, ranging from the starkly austere interplay between recorder and harpsichord in Fantasia (1975) to a poise and eloquent melodic line in the unaccompanied Pergolato(2011) that was to be his final work. Any thought of sequencing in chronological was rightly outweighed by that of presenting the works to confirm Borup-Jørgensen's ease in his writing for tenor, treble, descant and sopranino instruments. Petri and Elisabet Selin (the composer's daughter) share the honours, with, with Ingrid Myrhøj the virtuoso harpsichordist in the tensile Zwiegespräch (Dialogue,1989) and Gert Mortensen the comparably dedicated percussionist in Periphrasis (1977) which opens the disc in combative fashion. Gramophone October 2014
Gramophone Magazine

Great review in leading German Magazine for Chambermusic "Ensemble" on Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen!
Ensemble
24 March 2014
Review on Recorder music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen in German Magazine "Ensemble"!
Vogelkonzert
Michala Petri zwitschert und trillert fast vier minuten lang (in Track 5: "Vogelkonzert") auf einem Diskant-Blockflötchen wie ein Vögelchen: Welches Instrument Könnte das besser? Der Dane Axel Borup-Jørgensen, in Sweden aufgewachsen, in Kopenhagen ausgebildet, in Darmstadt mit Neuer Musik befasst, hat für die Meisterin und ihre einzige Privatschülerin, seine Tochter Elisabet Selin, Blockflötenstücke geschrieben, von denen acht auf dieser CD die ganze Breite seiner Kompositionskunst widerspiegeln: Die beiden spielen abwechselnd fünf Solowerke fûr unterschiedliche Blockflöten, dazu eines mit – knallig lautern! – Schlagwerk und zwei mit cembalo begleitet. In allen schmeichelt sich in tiefer Lage der warme, in höchster auch kreischen, zirpen und piepsen den Blockflötenton ins Ohr – gebändigte und losgelassene Natur! Maj 2014,- Diether Steppuhn
Ensemble

Gramophone on "The Percussion Universe of Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Gramophone Magazine
24 March 2014

Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012) will be a name unfamiliar to many though this Danish composer left a substantial body of work and finds meaningful accommodation between mid-20th-century modernism and the aesthetic concerns of an earlier era. This disc of music for and featuring percussion touches on all the relevant bases- not least Solo(1979), where archetypal groupings of metal, skin and wood are drawn into a continuity so that differences in timbre are outweighed by similarities of texture. Much the earliest piece her, Music for Percussion and Viola (1956) yields a rhythmic uniformity its composer was later to eschew, yet the gradual coalescing of opposites in a climatic processional is no less arresting for it.
The duo percussion medium is represented by La Primavera (1982) the longest and also slowest-burning work, which, despite its fastidious blending of instruments and the visceral exchanges towards its close, is likely as much visual as aural in appeal. Not so Periphrasis (1997), in which the interplay with recorder is made meaningful through the separating of un-tuned and tuned percussion that ensures an unbroken arc of expressive intensity through to the close. An outcome no less audiable in Winter Music (1984), except the brass quintet adds Varése-like plangency to music whose ominous import is pointedly not made explicit.
Recorded with startling clarity and informatively annotated, this release is another triumph for Gert Mortensen and the formidable roster of musicians with whom he has collaborated on this project-so resulting in memorable listening experience. Richard Whitehouse, Gramophone September 2014
Gramophone Magazine

Fantastic review in US Magazine Fanfare on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Fanfare Magazine
13 March 2014
Any idea that a disc of recorder music is going to be gentle and filled with happy pipings is instantly contradicted by the overtly Modernist drum poundings that open Periphrasis (1977, revised 1993–94), which arrive like so much thunder. It comes as no surprise to learn that Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924–2012) attended Darmstadt, first in 1959, returning in 1962. It is scored for recorder and percussion; the percussion writing is virtuosic (as is the performance in this recording); the instruments interact with and react to the recorder's likewise virtuosic statements. If the recorder has a chalumeau register, it is this which is on display in the later parts of the piece (around seven and a half minutes in). Michala Petri, surely the world's best-known (and loved) recorder player, demonstrates not only virtuosity but a true understanding of idiom.
Elisabet Selin, a name new to me and in fact the composer's daughter (and student of Michala Petri), is clearly of an equivalent level of virtuosity and musicality. Written for solo tenor recorder, Nachtstück (1967) is an intriguing meditation. It comes as no surprise to encounter multiphonics in this music; the surprise is that they are so convincingly rendered. There are even attempts at counterpoint. The result is remarkable, and caught in a vivid recording.
The shrill monodic adventures of the solo sopranino recorder (Petri) shape Architraves (1977). The reference to birds is visceral, and quite unlike Messiaen—a sort of mid-stage between birdsong proper and what Messiaen might have done with it perhaps, or a first-step transmogrification. Whatever, it remains on the tightrope between delightful and demanding. Our avian friends return in Birds Concert (1985), where Petri is once more at her most charming.
The arrival of the harpsichord is like listening to shards of glass: This particular harpsichord is a very forceful instrument, and is recorded viscerally in Zwiegerspräch of 1988–89. Here it is the sopranino recorder of Selin that complements the harpsichord with its shrillness. At only just over five minutes, the work feels too short (although it is relentless).The Fantasia of 1975 (revised 1986–88) for sopranino recorder (Selin) and harpsichord is the longest piece on the disc. The stamina of the players is truly remarkable, perhaps mostly in terms of sheer concentration. The intensity does not flag for a second. The solo recorder flights are remarkable in their inspiration; the harpsichord's antics are hardly less impressive. The ending is cheeky and teasing.
Written in 2011, Pergolato is for treble recorder, a five-minute lament delivered eloquently by Petri. The Notenbüchlein (as it is given on the back cover; in the notes it is Notenbüchlein für Anna Elisabeth) of 1977–78 is an exploratory piece whose solo melody (Selin), while not quite as melancholic as Pergolato, nevertheless speaks of questing, of searching.
A remarkable disc, stunningly performed and well recorded. Colin Clarke, Fanfare May/June issue 2014

Fanfare Magazine

Overwhelming review on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen in Klassik Heute
Klassik Heute Magazine
06 March 2014
Klassik Heute
Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Wertung: 10 / 10 / 10


Der dänische Komponist und Pianist Axel Borup-Jørgensen (1924-2012) war einer der großen, stillen Individualisten Skandinaviens im 20. Jahrhundert. In Dänemark geboren und in Schweden aufgewachsen, erhielt er seine Ausbildung an der Königlichen Musikakademie in Kopenhagen. Obwohl als Komponist weitgehend Autodidakt, zählte er 1959 zu den ersten dänischen Komponisten, die die Darmstädter Ferienkurse für Neue Musik besuchten. Wolfgang Fortner ermutigte den jungen Musiker, den eingeschlagenen Weg fortzusetzen. Ohne Zweifel übte die Avantgarde der Sechzigerjahre einen starken Einfluss auf Borup-Jørgensens Klangwelt aus, jedoch komponierte er nie streng seriell, sondern ließ sich in seiner kompositorischen Arbeit stets von Intuition und seinem außerordentlichen Klangsinn leiten. Borup-Jørgensens handschriftliche Partituren von geradezu kalligraphischer Qualität und Schönheit verraten den ausgesprochenen Klang-Tüftler und Magier der Farben. Seine Musik kennt feinste melodische Verästelungen ebenso wie zupackende, dramatische Eruptionen, so etwa in seinem orchestralen Hauptwerk Marin (1970) oder Musica autumnalis (1977). Der weit überwiegende Teil seines Schaffens ist der Kammermusik gewidmet. Hier genoss er die Freiheit und Inspiration, eng mit seinen Interpreten zusammenzuarbeiten und neue klangliche Möglichkeiten der Instrumente erforschen und erproben zu können.
Dass die Blockflöte in Axel Borup-Jørgensens Werkliste eine nicht unwesentliche Stellung einnimmt, verdanken wir seiner Begegnung (und lebenslangen Freundschaft) mit der dänischen Blockflötenvirtuosin Michala Petri und seiner Tochter Elisabet Selin, für die er zahlreiche anspruchsvolle Kompositionen geschaffen hat.
Diese ausgesprochen sorgfältig edierte, musikalisch, klanglich und nicht zuletzt auch optisch exzellente Produktion seiner (fast kompletten) Blockflötenmusik beleuchtet einen Zeitraum von fast dreißig Jahren – von seinen ersten Versuchen mit dem Instrument Mitte der Siebziger Jahre bis hin zu Pergolato, der etwas mehr als ein Jahr vor seinem Tod entstandenen letzten Komposition des damals 86-Jährigen.
Authentischer und kompetenter könnte die Wiedergabe nicht sein: Eben jene Spielerinnen, die sein Interesse am Instrument geweckt hatten und mit denen er in der Folge auf das Engste zusammenarbeitete, sind auf der Aufnahme zu hören. Borup-Jørgensens auffallende Affinität zu den hohen Instrumenten der Blockflötenfamilie und ihrem der Frauenstimme ähnlichen wie auch dem Vogelgesang verwandten Klang macht es nicht leicht, die Werke dramaturgisch so geschickt und abwechslungsreich anzuordnen wie man es etwa von einem Konzertprogramm erwarten würde. Die CD ist offensichtlich auch eher „enzyklopädisch" gedacht – als Referenzsammlung seiner Blockflötenwerke.
Periphrasis (1977 ursprünglich für Flöte und Schlagzeug komponiert und in den Neunziger Jahren für Blockflöte adaptiert) firmiert als fulminanter Auftakt. Im dialogischen Spiel fungiert die Blockflöte häufig als ruhender Pol im faszinierenden Klangfarbenkaleidoskop des Perkussionsappartes, der subtil mit den vier wechselnden Blockflöten (von Sopranino bis Tenor) interagiert. In welchem Maße sich Borup-Jørgensen in die Idiomatik des Instrumentes eingehört und –gedacht hat, zeigt sich vor allem im für seine Tochter komponierten Tenorflöten-Monolog Nachtstück aus dem Jahr 1987. Hier schafft er einen eigenen Kosmos von äußerster Expressivität der feinen Zwischentöne, der sich aus der Stille ganz allmählich geräuschhaft vortastend zu einer dramatischen Klimax mit blockhaften Akkordklängen steigert, um letztlich zu verstummen. Für mich vielleicht die unmittelbarste und auch formal geschlossenste Komposition der CD. Elisabet Selin realisiert hier nicht allein akribisch die detaillierten Farbnuancierungen der Partitur, sondern gestaltet den Spannungsbogen so zwingend souverän und von einer dramatischen Intensität wie man sie selten hört. Der einzigartige, unverwechselbare Ton Michala Petris prägt Architraves, ein hypnotisches  Solostück für Sopraninoblockflöte. Das über ein Jahrzehnt später entstandene konzise Zwiegespräch knüpft klanglich daran an, erweitert aber die Besetzung mit dem silbrig-hellen Klang des Cembalos und kontrastiert die hohe Blockflöte mit sonoren, koloristischen Clustertexturen. Mitte der Neunziger Jahre entstand Birds Concert für Sopranblockflöte, das u.a. mit verschiedenen Trillern, Vorschlagsnoten und Flatterzungenspiel eine (jahrhundertelange) Tradition von Vogelmusik für das Instrument fortführt. Die 1975 komponierte Fantasia war das erste Werk Borup-Jørgensens, in dem er sich professionell mit der Blockflöte befasste und Ausgangspunkt einer kreativen Entdeckungsreise, die bis zum Ende seines Schaffens anhalten sollte. Wie Zwiegespräch für die Kombination von Sopranino und Cembalo konzipiert (und wie im ersten Falle von Elisabet Selin und ihrer Mutter Ingrid Myrhøj interpretiert), erzeugt das Stück von Beginn an eine gänzlich eigene, mysteriös-gespenstische Klangwelt von großer atmosphärischer Dichte. Der Kreis von Borup-Jørgensens kompositorischem Œuvre schließt sich in Pergolato mit dem weichen, milden Klang der Altblockflöte. Das für seine früheren Stücke so charakteristische hypnotisierende Kreisen, die dramatischen, raumgreifenden Intervallsprünge und abrupten Registerwechsel weichen in Pergolato meditativer Ruhe und lyrischer Melancholie. Wie in einer posthumen Verneigung vor dem großen Künstler und Freund strahlt Michala Petris Spiel hier besondere Würde und Demut aus. Das die CD beschließende Notenbüchlein für Sopranblockflöte solo (1977-79 für seine Tochter Elisabet Selin entstanden und hier auch von ihr gespielt) fasst in Form einer Suite von Miniaturstücken noch einmal kurios die charakteristischen Merkmale von Borup-Jørgensens Blockflötenmusik zusammen. 
OUR Recordings hat mit dieser Produktion (wieder einmal) Maßstäbe gesetzt. Gewiss, Borup-Jørgensens Musik ist keine „leichte Kost", aber sie ist ein gewichtiger Meilenstein der Blockflötenmusik des 20. Jahrhunderts – eine Musik von höchster Individualität und Geradlinigkeit, der man sich nur schwer entziehen kann.

Heinz Braun
(04.03.2014)

Klassik Heute Magazine

Great Gapplegate review on Recorder Music by Axel Borup-Jørgensen
Gapplegate
12 February 2014
Gapplegate Classical-Modern Music Review
Modern classical and avant garde concert music of the 20th and 21st centuries forms the primary focus of this blog. It is hoped that through the discussions a picture will emerge of modern music, its heritage, and what it means for us.

Up until now when I thought of recorders, I thought of the baroque and early music periods and the sound one hears in such contexts. It never occurred to me that the high modern arena would utilize the family of instruments and I cannot recall having heard such a thing.
But all that is in the past now that I have immersed myself in Axel Borup-Jorgensen's CD Recorder Music (OUR Recordings 8.226910). We are treated to eight compositions for various-sized recorders--alone, with harpsichord or with percussion. No less than seven of these works are enjoying their world premier recordings on this disk.
The recorder performances are in the hands of Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin, and they are impressive exponents indeed. Ingrid Myrhoj appears on harpsichord for two pieces; Gert Mortensen plays the multiple percussion instrument part on the one work involved. Everyone sounds great but it is the expanded recorder techniques and the clarity, dynamic thrust and elan of their execution that bring it all together.
Alex Borup-Jorgensen (1924-2012) wrote these works between 1975 and 2011. That they were a labor of love seems clear as you listen. The mastering of the recorder parts by Michala Petri and Elisabet Selin were no doubt labors of love as well.
The earlier works feature rapid-fire jumps into and out of various registers; the later works less so. In any case the parts are difficult and superbly played. It's almost uncanny to hear the recorder in an expanded, ultra-modern tonality. Once one gets over the shock the idea that these are fine works that bear repeated hearings sets in. And from that point I was hooked.
This is not just state-of-the-art modern recorder music. It is also a collection of very pleasing high-modern chamber music.
Very much recommended.
Grego Applegate Edwards, February 3th 2014

Gapplegate